I'm Claudio and I suck at everything.

It’s times like these when I wish that I had some minute form of self worth yo

ageofdestruction:

elaine: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

First 6 images cover 9°S to 20°S, 129°E to 131°E, showing the centre of Herschel Crater, photographed by MEx, 23rd June 2006.

Last 3 images show the detail highlighted in the 2nd image, photographed by MRO, 16th February 2012.

Image credit: ESA (MEx), NASA/JPL/UoA (MRO). Composite: AgeOfDestruction.

(via s-c-i-guy)

amphetameme:

i get so flustered whenever interviewers ask me ‘so why do you want to work here?’ because the first thing that pops into my head everytime is ‘i need your money to survive, you capitalist pig’ but thats not the appropriate answer

(via crumblybutgood)

thenewenlightenmentage:

Black Holes Aren’t Black After All, Say Theoretical Physicists
Collapsed stars are just too big to trap light forever
Black holes are a crucial part of the great cultural legacy of Einstein’s theory of general relativity. They have fascinated scientists and laypeople alike since they entered the public consciousness in the latter half of the 20th century.
But it may be time to say goodbye to the notion of regions of space so dense that even light becomes trapped within them. In the last year or so, an intense debate about the paradoxical properties of black holes has left a number of theoretical physicists, including Stephen Hawking, suggesting that black holes might not exist at all, at least not in the form that anyone had imagined.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Black Holes Aren’t Black After All, Say Theoretical Physicists

Collapsed stars are just too big to trap light forever

Black holes are a crucial part of the great cultural legacy of Einstein’s theory of general relativity. They have fascinated scientists and laypeople alike since they entered the public consciousness in the latter half of the 20th century.

But it may be time to say goodbye to the notion of regions of space so dense that even light becomes trapped within them. In the last year or so, an intense debate about the paradoxical properties of black holes has left a number of theoretical physicists, including Stephen Hawking, suggesting that black holes might not exist at all, at least not in the form that anyone had imagined.

Continue Reading

nasasapod:

M51: The Whirlpool Galaxy in Dust and Stars Image Credit: N. Scoville (Caltech), T. Rector (U. Alaska, NOAO) et al., Hubble Heritage Team, NASA
Explanation: The Whirlpool Galaxy is a classic spiral galaxy. At only 30 million light years distant and fully 60 thousand light years across, M51, also known as NGC5194, is one of the brightest and most picturesque galaxies on the sky. The above image is a digital combination of a ground-based image from the 0.9-meter telescopeat Kitt Peak National Observatory and a space-based image from the Hubble Space Telescope highlighting sharp features normally too red to be seen. Anyone with a good pair of binoculars, however, can see this Whirlpool toward the constellation of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici. M51 is a spiral galaxy of type Sc and is the dominant member of a whole group of galaxies. Astronomers speculate that M51's spiral structure is primarily due to its gravitational interaction with a smaller galaxyjust off the top of the image.

nasasapod:

M51: The Whirlpool Galaxy in Dust and Stars 
Image Credit: N. Scoville (Caltech), T. Rector (U. Alaska, NOAOet al.Hubble Heritage TeamNASA

Explanation: The Whirlpool Galaxy is a classic spiral galaxy. At only 30 million light years distant and fully 60 thousand light years across, M51, also known as NGC5194, is one of the brightest and most picturesque galaxies on the sky. The above image is a digital combination of a ground-based image from the 0.9-meter telescopeat Kitt Peak National Observatory and a space-based image from the Hubble Space Telescope highlighting sharp features normally too red to be seen. Anyone with a good pair of binoculars, however, can see this Whirlpool toward the constellation of the Hunting Dogs (Canes VenaticiM51 is a spiral galaxy of type Sc and is the dominant member of a whole group of galaxies. Astronomers speculate that M51's spiral structure is primarily due to its gravitational interaction with a smaller galaxyjust off the top of the image.

(via shychemist)